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last october at the values voter summit. it has been crisscrossing the united states registering voters of sporting concerted candidates are running for office, and shining the light on this administration and its failed policies. please take a few minutes to step on board between new and to, today and tomorrow. it's parked recognize the exhibit hall. just follow the signs. you can't miss it. speaking of the exhibit hall we are delighted to have many profamily conservative organizations from all over the country or exhibiting with us. in fact, the second year in a row with so many we had to overflow in the air on the other side of the exhibit hall and was called birdcage walk. we plan to visit these wonderful exhibitors and to show them your appreciation for all the work they do. we are pleased to have our good friend of the media research center again as or sponsor of new media wrote located in the ballroom and, of course, you'll be hearing from a president roosevelt later in the program. almost finished. hang in there. i'm trying to make these announcements as dynamic as possible. [la
outgoing mexican president felipe calderon on his country's relations with the united states. >> president obama held a campaign rally in milwaukee over the weekend, one month before early voting begins in this battleground state of wisconsin. [cheers and applause] >> this was the president's first visit to the state since february. a recent quinnipiac university/new york times/cbs poll of likely voters in wisconsin found president obama leading mitt romney 51-45%. this is about half an hour. [cheers and applause] ♪ ♪ ♪ [cheers and applause] >> hello, wisconsin! [cheers and applause] oh! hi! you guys sound like you're fired up already! [cheers and applause] it is good to be back in milwaukee! [cheers and applause] first of all, it's good to be back because this is the closest i've been the home in a couple of months -- [cheers and applause] i was thinking about hopping on the freeway and just driving on down. you know, hour and a half, maybe a little shorter with a motorcade, you know? [laughter] i am also glad to be in milwaukee because before i came out here, i was able to have an
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, september 21, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable richard blumenthal, a senator from the state of connecticut, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader smed. mr. reid: i had move to proceed to calendar number 504. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 504, s. 3525, a bill to protect and enhance opportunities for recreational hunting, fish, and shooting and for other purposes. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: the next hour will be equally divided between the two leader leaders who are their designees.
to be realistic about how we can tackle these challenges. if there is a crisis that i see in the united states for the long term, it is not the temporal issue of how we will deal with money. because i am very confident we will be able to deal with that. it is how will we bring that -- bring back our sense of what we can accomplish together as americans when we are realistic about those challenges. that is the thing i think about the word "crisis" in this country. >> mayor castro is not the first to suggest that. for 10 years now, we heard that the government is not asking all of us to do enough. >> it is interesting. the word "sacrifice," when i hear a politician say that, it usually means grab your wallet. it usually means increasing taxes. and i will give president obama credit to in his the first presidential candidate since walter mondale to run explicitly on a platform that he will raise taxes. >> he is saying he will raise taxes on the wealthy. >> according to the supreme court, he already has raised taxes. that was the basis on which the supreme court of held obamacare, that it was a ta
, but that is critical cause more trouble than any of the problem we've got fiscally in the united states. getting medicare costs under control is the number-one thing. >> you say we also surcharged smokers and the obese for their medicare coverage. where did that idea come from? >> i am the person that put it in the memo but i didn't have to fight very hard for it. also, i ran into this, something i ran in "the washington post" install of calling people morbidly obese i called them mega fatties and i was refuted by "the washington post" for being insensitive, which i guess i probably am. this is another thing where everybody knows this to be true and someone has to pay for it. there should be penalties. i'm not really a democrat but i'm certainly democrat compared to him. you have to be responsible to some extent for your personal behavior. someone is going to pay for it. >> quite right. we should point out also we are not only ones making arguments like this. there are other bipartisan commissions and so forth. the task force that was headed by a was rivlin and pete domenici, a democrat and repu
judiciary led the way to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and oral brennan to the supreme court, but the host of liberal republicans such as the president appointed himself like albert title of georgia and john of louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment i think that eisenhower made at that time is that of john marshall hall of the great conservative justice and just after the landmark decision in brown v board of education. shortly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died leaving the vacancy on the court, and at that point roosevelt turned to the grandson of the great marshall harlem who would be the only dissenter in percy versus ferguson and 1896, the case legalized segregation by appointing the great dissenter eisenhower was making a statement he could not have adored. he said eisenhower was going to enforce it. when the segregation attempted to swap the integration in little rock eisenhower sent
to the united states from the other states of the european union over for lunch. okay? germans in the chair, ambassadors from america, from the e.u. states over for lunch. he would then have an american coming in and be the lunchtime entertainment. the american-led come and give the lunchtime talk. i'm not sure who else was there. i would expect the secretary of state was invited, secretary defense. and the central intelligence agency. so i get invited and say okay, i've got a representative from every country in the european union. what makes an interesting speech? i've got it. let's talk about reconditions, interrogations'. so i did. [laughter] and i began the conversation -- i had a great staff at the cia. you are blessed as a people with the talent and morality of the folks in your service and i had a wonderful stuff and great speeches. was rear i would let anybody go with almost irresistible temptation to fool around with someone else's and i would make changes, but this was so important. an awful lot of it i wrote, and i remember page two or page three of the speech, you know, about m
american forces like we had not seen in years. one of the first mobilizations was our united states military. and they were called to serve bravely in remote corners of the global. 11 years later the mastermind of 9/11, osama bin laden, was taken down, and we now have an al qaeda that is severely diminished, and we are bringing our troops home from that part of the world. but, mr. president, for the troops when they come home, the fight is not over. there's another fight when they get back home to america. it's a different type of battle. the unemployment rate among veterans returning from iraq and afghanistan was just under 11% in august. it's higher for those who are younger, and this problem is likely to continue to grow as we draw down in afghanistan, just like we've already drawn down in iraq. it's worth noting that there have been steps made in the right direction. this past summer we passed legislation that'll help veterans get federal occupational licenses when their military training matches the civilian requirements. that was a bill that i had the privilege of sponsoring.
that the united states has to survive. it has to survive to show the world that the representative governments can work. the kids in 1848 in a series of revolutions in europe as they see it a failed as the democratic revolution, and so they see the united states this is it, the world's last shot. it has to work your order will never be tried again. so the states think they can destroy the government which is how the unions see it because they don't like to get elected. they said self-government doesn't work, so we have to prove that the thing can survive and that's how they start. but you don't have to be in a very long before they begin to think why do they get into this to begin with? talk to this virus and slaves -- southerners and slaves and they got into the problem to begin with because the institution of slavery. if you want to solve a problem, the only way to do it is to root out the cause. so union soldiers made a shift much earlier than i had anticipated. the big shift begins in the summer of 1861 with soldiers beginning to write home to their families and elected officials to say that i
to millions suffering from hiv aids. second is to foster a substantial united states strategic interests. perhaps military or diplomatic or economic. third is another purpose and one that i think has to receive much more attention and higher priority. in a romney administration and that is aid that elevates people and brings about lasting change in communities and nations. here is an example. a lot of americans including myself are troubled by developments in the middle east. syria has witnessed the killing of tens of thousands of people. the presidents of egypt is a member of the muslim brotherhood. our ambassador to libya was assassinated in a terrorist attack. iran is moving toward nuclear weapons capability. we somehow feel we are at the mercy of events rather than shaping events. i am often asked why. what can we do about it? to ease the suffering and enter and the hate and violence? religious extremism is part of a problem but that is not the whole story. the population of the middle east is very young particularly in comparison to the population of the developed nations. typically
to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and william brennan to supreme court. it was a host of liberal republicans that roosevelt appointed himself. men like elbert tuttle of georgia and john wants in a louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment, i think, that eisenhower made at the time, was that of john marshall harlan, great conservative justice, just after the court's landmark decision in brown versus board of education. certainly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died, leaving a vacancy on the court. at that point, roosevelt turned to harlem, who is the grandson of the great john marshall harlan, who had been the only dissenter in 1896, a place that utilized segregation, by pointing harlem, the main gate of the great dissenter, eisenhower was making a statement of the south could not ignore. desegregation was the law of the land and eisenhower was going to enforce it. when a mob attempted to block it,
to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington d.c., september 12, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten e. gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: madam president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: the senate is now considering the motion to proceed to s. 3547, the veterans job corps act. 70 minutes will be equally divided this morning between the two leaders or their designees with the republicans controlling the first half and the majority controlling the final half. we'll begin consideration of veterans jobs bill today. it's unfortunate that we're having to go through all this, another couple of filibusters on this bill. but th
introduced that topic as a very essential topic of the foreign policy of the united states. it was not theory. it became a reality. and one by one the countries of derision which were not used to elections or not used to democratic governments for many years and decades suddenly one after the other started to become democratic governments. and, of course, after he left the presidency he didn't go home to write memoirs and maybe play some golf. he has a beautiful house, i enjoy to visit you. he decided to be, continue being a big player many -- in supporting the same principles, human rights and democracy. and we see president carter going from one country to another observing elections. he has the ability to have the possibility to talk in friendly, in a friendly way with different actors in the region. i have witnessed that. it could be that maybe some actors are antagonist to the united states. maybe some of the actors do have different views about how the world should function. or different cultures about what democracy is. but president carter has the talent, the ability, the wisdom to in
the danger confronts us here in the united states or abroad. in june of 2009, fbi director robert mueller acknowledged the immense challenge facing the bureau stating: it is not sufficient for us as an organization to respond to a terrorist attack after it has occurred. it is important for us as an organization to develop the intelligence to anticipate a terrorist attack. developing intelligence, developing facts. in the past we looked at collecting facts for the courtroom. we now have to think of ourselves as gathering facts and painting a picture of a particular threat understanding the risk and moving to reduce that risk. and i couldn't agree more with the director's statement. and then on november the 5th, 2009, a gunman walked into the soldier readiness center at fort hood, texas, and shouted the classic jihadist term, allahu akbar, and opened fire on soldiers and civilians. he killed 14 and wounded 42 others. this was the most horrific terrorist attack on u.s. soil since 9/11. today we will examine the facts of the fort be hood case as we know them -- fort hood case as we know them
. they are people like corporal dare onterrell hicks, united states army, from hawley, north carolina, who died july 19 of 2012, just two months ago. darian was a 2009 graduate where he was a standout students, loved and respected by all. darian always wanted to be a soldier. it was a goal he set early on and something that everyone remembers about him. it was a goal he pursued with diligence and honor. he was a model junior rotc student who was voted mr. junior r.t.c. by his peers. -- rotc by his peers. darian is remembered as the kind of young man a teacher wishes all their students were like. he was a boy you wanted your children to be friends with. he became the kind of man we should all be thankful to have in this world. when i was speaking with his mom, address, she said -- tracy, she shared with me he never gave her a problem, ever. corporate hicks enlisted in the army after graduating from high school. he loved the army and it seemed he had found his place in life. he loved his family and he kept in close contact with his mother. whenever he spoke with his mom, she would always tell him, alw
or iran or turkey invoking the greatness of their own power and impact and the united states tends to be more future oriented but in this particular case you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis and in the iranian revolution is still very formative and the - of americans who are responsible for the iran policy. >> guest: it is. ambassador ryan crocker told me one time in an interview that they are the most historical were the least historical society. and in this case i think there's still certainly every time they have a negotiation including the most recent one in moscow during the whole litany of grievances, so it is always on their mind. whether the u.s. policy makers realize it or not, the are too. the first years after the revolution clearly the hostage issue was for most american policy makers mind. if the iran contra happens that causes the relationship with the next prior risk and we saw it happen to ronald reagan and over a series of instances where they have spurred u.s. efforts to the rapprochement. there's a great example like to give just on this idea of the mo
'm a forecaster, but we, you know, the united states is in this sort of very different position. you might argue japan, somewhat different circumstances, very high domestic savings rate, managed to sort of face a different set of constraints in that environment, but i ultimately agree with vince that, like, you have to deal with this problem, and you can't get around it. but we're operating under somewhat different constraints. >> john? >> yeah. which is everything's fine until it's not fine. but -- >> i didn't say not -- [laughter] >> the point is this time is different. [laughter] >> anyway, of course -- >> don't want to go there, vince? >> with yeah. >> all this precluding vince and ken's study was music to the ears of the folks at the imf who have had this view for some time that this is how these situations have to be, have to be dealt with. but certainly lew is right, everything doesn't have to get fixed today, but it's got to get fixed, and it's been the key, and the key is that it has to be that people have to have confidence that it will be fixed, and that's the tricky part; namely, how
of nuclear missiles, getting way ahead of the united states in defense and wait it was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. to some extent, one of the reasons that he won the election in 1960. he gets into office and has access to intelligence and realizes that actually soviets are way behind, extremely behind. there is a missile gap in the united states. the problem was that kennedy in the campaign, they said that we need hugely increased defense in order to make up for it and he was committed to that. the result was in 1961 at that time, the largest defense bill in human history, and it was to a great extent that it made -- needless to say, the missiles could have caused a lot of destruction. >> host: wended nikita khrushchev come on the scene? >> guest: it did take some people to the blog, but not nikita khrushchev. there were two leaders who were essentially a joint leadership. by 19541956, khrushchev was a supreme leader. >> host: what policy changes came with his ascension? >> guest: khrushchev would've been shocking to anyone in the wes
american forces, became two-term president of the united states and the for some reason the los angeles press corps was paralyzed in place. so i stepped forward and i began asking questions of what i called, general eisenhower. i didn't call him the president because, to me had always been a general. we had really good exchange. and in which he said he wanted reagan to run as a favorite son in six at this it. -- '68. you thought that with be good for the party around good for the country. that was in his own way a shot at rich richard nixon. >> guest: boom, you write, one minute ike and man in gray flannel suit in the lonely crowd and next minute, tune on, tune in, drop out, time for we shall overcome and burn baby burn. while americans were walking on the moon, americans were dying in vietnam. there were assassinations and riots. jackie kennedy became jackie o. ty e-die shirts rpt martin luther king, jr. george wallace, tom hayden and. mick jagger and wayne newton. well you get the idea, boom. >> guest: i don't want to overstate this seldom in our recent history at least has there been
the very stylish, 34-year-old first lady of the united states surrounded by all these dashing people and then that came to an end. and the war began to heat up and suddenly the country seemed, seemed to come unhinged in a way. all the values of the world war ii generation come home with challenged within their own families. institutions of government, place of government in our lives. the idea of loyaltity and patriotism all went out the window. civil rights movement went from nonviolent movement led by dr. king depending on rule of law, it went to the streets. you know, violence in america is as as american as cherry pie. so it was a, it was a head-snapping time. there was no question about it and the fact that we emerged from it and reasonably good shape is still fairly astonishing to me. it is a real tribute to the tense aisle strength of this country in a lot of ways. >> host: i began my marriage, tom brokaw writes and my career as journalist in 1962, a straight arrow product of the 1960s. by the time decade was over i had my first taste of the marijuana, i had long hair and week
the united states was the only country on earth where we put our hands over our hearts when we say the national anthem. which was quickly disproved just by looking at youtube, people around the world going like this when they sang the national anthem. he dropped that the very next day. i don't think he ever said it again. >> he paid the price. >> maybe. >> i would say that's an example of actually changing behavior, which i think happens rarely in small increments. >> and i think the other thing, we're talking before the panel with brendan about this, i think the other thing we don't know was how many conversations are going on with campaign message people, with people making as, with speechwriters come as they are talking about wording? and how often are they sang well, if we say that the fact checkers will get us. now, i suspect that's happening a lot. but the only evidence i have had of it as a column written by connie schultz who is married to jerry brown, who said that conversation happened in the brown campaign. i suspect it is happening in many campaigns, and i think that th
-thirds of the united states. and the corn crop is going to be really reduced because of it. and if you planted 80 million to 85 million acres of corn and we had the same drought, you'd still have the high price of grain that we have right now but you wouldn't have ethanol to blame for it. so the marketplace is bringing about the increased production of corn because of feed, fuel and fiber, and -- and you should not be scapegoating ethanol because if we didn't have ethanol to blame, we wouldn't be planting 95, 96 million acres of corn, we'd be planting about 80 million to 85 million acres of corn and we'd still have the same problem, the same high price, the same problem for the poultry producers. now to the point that i came to the senate. we all recognize that our nation faces challenging times. we've had years with unemployment at unacceptable levels and anemic economic growth that shows no sign of lifting us out of the situation. meanwhile, rampant government spending, which we were promised would jump-start the economy and create jobs, has instead displaced private-sector investment and choke
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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